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CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different region
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
time thinking and talking about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico border of 1846. grant said at the time i do not think there was ever more wicked were then that waged by the united states of mexico. i thought so at the time when i was the dexter, only i had not moral courage enough to resign. during the time of the u.s.-mexico war, i just found this are really moving "which is why it took it for my title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. wanted to talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s.-mexico war from being with it -- really enthusiastic and in favor to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to offi
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
myth of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drasticall
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:25pm EST
salvation army and changing the role in the u.s.. islamic the salvation army which many people don't realize is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside of department stores in the christmas season it's what they call the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas especially impoverished areas would have parades' and make lots of malaise the symbols trying to attract especially the urban poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the case
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:15am EST
that the first wave of troops were u.s. marines. they wanted to bring their own helicopters, the own logistics. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security team and senior people at the state department, over the whole question of what is it wise to try to broach potential peace talks with the taliban. we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting a common person to try to achieve the present school in the country. >> who is summer? >> so, she is a young american woman who come and there she is on the bottom right, who had extensive foreign development experience and put her hand up to go to afghanistan. to
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
the u.s. military particularly the air force defeated geography in the balkans. it turns out the army did well despite of, and the successful conclusion to the war in bosnia and kosovo were a factor in allowing nato to expand to the black sea although nobody really wrote to that. and what is really the success of the balkans and a panel and we were bloodied to bits in somalia that made people think we can do anything. and that's when geography got its revenge in the mountains and the desert sahara and afghanistan because the transformative moment for me i was embedded with the first battalion of the marine. en and coo eight in march of 2004 we were making an overland journey with several hundred miles to fallujah and it wasn't yet on the news, the battle of fallujah was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah and all we did this transport one marine battalion from one place to another, it wasn't particularly dangerous, but the statistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water models, tool kits, the meals ready to eat. it was just immense logistical exercise
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:00am EST
your mind of world war ii. i'll make a couple of suggestions. you might try picturing a burning u.s. warship at pearl harbor. or if you'd rather do a happier image, how about a man kissing a woman, leaning and kissing a woman in times square in new york on the third day. or maybe you prefer politics. how about churchville, stalin and roosevelt a filter sitting down together. maybe that image. or maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese american
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. detention policy in the war on terrorism, the government's ability to detain without trial individuals suspected of involvement in terrorism, it seems that the one that dominates all others is the extent to which future u.s. to some policy will and should be subject to judicial review. why is this not settled? well, if you the citizens and non-citizens, i think it's both sold and moved that these dissensions will be subject to review, settled because we have a series of cases in the early part of the last decade or the courts actually rejected arguments offered by the bush and restoration that such cases raised a political question settled because these individuals clearly have rights of the constitution including the right tit review and neat because dss has not picked up anyone hitting this category and subject -- subjected them to end of military tension says it doesn't three. there have only been three cases in custody their detention in austin years now, and i think that's partly going to stay for a
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 4:15pm EST
him, had tried against him. because syria was -- opposed the u.s. led invasion of iraq in 2003. the syrian government was looking the other way or even supporting jihaddists who were entering into iraq and killing american and allies forces. so the u.s. and syria were on opposite sides of the street, to say the least. he survived that. he survived the association with the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i talked to him t
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00pm EST
their operations within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60'
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:00am EST
we know wrongly about slavery in the u.s.? >> guest: well, one of the issues that i try to deal with in the book is the process by which slavery ended, and the geographical reach of slavery. i think the view that tends to be handed down is by the 19th century, certainly, a country neatly divided between the so-called free states and the so-called slave state, and, of course, the civil war growing out of that conflict. my issue is not whether slavery's at the root of the civil war, which it certainly was, but what interested me was the relationship between the early emancipation of slaves in the northern states, and the later emancipation of slaves much larger in scale in the southern states. slavery was legal in all of the british colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th century, and gradually, northern states and northeast and mid an lat tick states began to abolish slavely, but i learned it was a gradual process. it took a long time. what we discoveredded there were laves in new jersey in 1860, and most of the states that abolished slavery between 1780 and 1804, the
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00am EST
, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really the csh to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 7:30pm EST
of the statue of liberty they did the statue of dollar that all proof set from the u.s. government go in this as well. new look at this for $1,699 and you get all of thisre kennedy half dollar proof sets and remember the that is $34.50 and $56.50 and $34.95 and $55.50 etc.. they're all valuable also is all the dollars and everything else. there is the constitution dollars of 1987 and 1988 is another olympia and then 1989 is thecongress of white the eisenhower. -- eisenhower. popular sets. you are paying about $100 per set for them.then i will explain about this one in a minute. the only one where the half dollar is also2 silver this1 is the james madison5 commemorative54 and then9 the world cup commemoratives and in '95 the silvo commemorative. and the most valuable of all of these and if you go to www.hsn.com this set is $549 right here. i sell them all the time of that price. i sold them individually out in five minutes last night. $700 basically for those 2 sets. of them at $100 i sell them out in like two seconds. the most popular singles that i have is one right here.all in the o
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 8:00am EST
introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person addicted to both politics and academic and women's history, i and i'm sure all of us are interested in this presentation so thanks for being here. you couldn't be in a better counter this talky their since much of grand rapids has been very highly invested in the health-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of american health care reform inc
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
interest because you have to remember that after the first world war the u.s. was already a dominant economic power in the world by far. industrial power. already was the world's creditor, but did not take on responsibility for the making of a global capital. and part of what we're looking at historical the is how it came to see the interest of american capital as intent with the interest of open, global, well, fraud capitol. how did it develop the confidence in the capacities through the depression and through the second world war to take on that project, the making of a global capitalism and then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essen
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:30pm EST
>> next comment michael rockland tax that experiences as a cultural attachÉ at the u.s. embassy in madrid during the 1960s. this is about an hour and a half. [applause] >> i thought i'd begin by telling you how this book came about. i am on a train from valencia to barcelona, just a few years ago. and it turns at the woman sitting next to me is not only professor at the university of valencia, but the head of their press. she said, and there's the end you're at the embassy. i said yeah. i thought to tell her some stories as she said, would you read the book for us? i said sure. it is the fastest contract ever gotten my life. and i'll pass it around. that's this copy of the book, the spanish version and also pass around the american version they are somewhat different. either way, my publisher, john hansen who is right. and his wife, judy is on the air. here in the united states they do wonderful things. they do wonderful, creative publishing, especially in a world where nobody reads anymore were very few do, so you do so i'm glad you're here tonight. so after it came out in spain,
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 9:00am EST
newspapers and magazine that entered the e-book market, launched its own u.s. aid tomorrow, the idea being with an e-book, publisher that any strike can cut the market early and timely topics of a political nature as the election season shows they could get the news out in a wider way with an e-book and if they had to wait several months or a year for e-book. >> michael grunwald's book "the new new deal" which is about the economic stimulus, i found it very interesting and not the kind of stuff we were reading, seeing people discuss on tv, he writes for time magazine and is sort of a non-partisan and an appreciation of what the stimulus not only did for the economy but what it means for the environment, sort of a story that got lost in all the politics in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
had served as the vice president and managing director of u.s. programs for save the children. he also chairs the national commission on children and disasters, and of course he received an honorary degree from the whole the cross in 2010 and delivered the commencement address. mark, welcome. i am here to say something about the life and achievements of sergeant shriver, mark's death. summarizing his life in a few minutes is about as easy as trying to reduce the recent hurricane to a gentle breeze. his was an amazing life, and all of the work familiar with it will concur with the universally state observation that he was indeed a good man. to read his fossils' biographee is to encounter the life of a modern st. and in his eulogy in the funeral sargent shriver really was that good. he was born in 1915. his parents were social catholic justice advocates and his godfather was the cardinal james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediac
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
services. you could buy one from the u.s. printing office, but if he went to wildlife refuge and stopped at the information kiosk, you could pick one up and read about the refugee you are visiting. but what you do get a sense of a person was doing. again, this is a pamphlet you get for free if you went to the national wildlife refuge. assateague is under the barrier islands typical of the middle atlantic coast. never more than three miles short assurer, length turned she could keep amsc. seen from the gear, the migrated waterfall coming in from the north must have seen it. its eastern borders of white residents in the curbs around the southern end of the island to form a nearly enclosed herbert. back from the beach to say nothing to load games in the hills of sand a little by little ground and restrained at the beach grasses and the locus succulents and loving dune plants. as the vegetation increases commit to a follow into salt marshes or during the day. like islands standing on the marsh areas are firmer, higher ground, carpeted tickets at myrtle, mayberry comes >> , rose. scat
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:05am EST
copyright reform and they mean different things but from my perspective on behalf of the u.s. copyright office but many provisions require review and updating and the great challenge is how we reflect the digital age with the foundational principles of the copyright system and with that i would like to start with the thought full professor on the ant. could you talk about how evolution of the book as such with the fourth sale doctrine? >> thank you for the generous introduction and the invitation. it is a special pleasure to be here today to talk to this audience about the subject. also this panel relieves me of a problem that i have when i talk about this topic , what to call the massive individual collective well-being that is in in the constitutional language and in everything courts have said over the years from the public objective it is a problem to call than users because it shows the role that is too passive of consumers. citizens is a little vague and perhaps and over inclusive but i don't have to worry about that today that i can say we talk about the public of readers they ar
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 11:00pm EST
mockery of the u.s. constitution and was therefore quickly dismissed as a level with the time. a self-described new democrat he sets his policies would have been only the second president to face impeachment, a drastic measure that republican leaders immediately dropped as an absurd active in the lofty constitutional standard for impeachment of high crimes and misdemeanors. also self aware enough to realize they're own marital infidelities would have tainted the already dubious legal proceedings. these considerations as well as they share revulsion at the thought of tying up two branches of government for months and diverting millions of taxpayer dollars to a trial the public would quickly unmasked as a political and motivated ploy prompted house leaders to simply allow americans to assess his personal indiscretions for themselves. this noble gesture restraint continues to inform the conduct of republicans to the state. >> on that note of like to read the entry for homosexuality >> on that note. sexual attraction between politically conservative or evangelical white males. some sexual
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 12:00pm EST
cities in the u.s. in 1810, is home to several institutions of higher learning including the university at albany, state university of new york, the albany the law school which is the fourth oldest law school in the u.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individual
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 6:00pm EST
. anthony dollars, one of the most ill-fated in the u.s. government. it looks just like 1/4. it was only made 79-81 for three years. it was the last regular issued government issued coin they made the san francisco mint uncirculated condition with the proof. it had all kinds of problems. it makes it a commercial failure but makes it a collectable absolutesaffordable at $129 and a customer pick but $109.95 the most affordablen set released by the u.s. government of all the coin sets we have. the 1999 season the anthony. most people do not even know that coin exists. it was not in the proofset and not man said. that coin you gotta individually--mint- set coin! these, $79 apiece.are $109 across the board for everything that you see. >>host: explain where you get numbers. >>guest: i talked about getting individually and the reason is pretty simple. people buy coins individually to build their sets. when i say if purchased individually that is the way most people put their coins together. the coin catalog they are the lord largest coin catalogers kind of the gold standard and has always been
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
got to memphis that we were aware of our mission. it was such a delicate, uncomfortable effort. u.s. military and it was a military oftentimes i say i'm army out of place. the military police had the mission sometimes to put down domestic disturbances that they occurred once every 100 years assumptive to that effect, clearly not the mission of the 82nd airborne are the 101st or even the marine corps who were present that morning. 19,000 troops. two units had prepared, had been given advance notice as to what they were doing and they prepared for it in riot control. why all of this for one african-american student who wanted to get an education? it's a brand name university. it's because the whole state was an insurrection from the government to to the statehouse itself statehouse itself down to the 11-year-old who were throwing bricks at us in the streets. it was total chaos, a little mayhem and even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away so there was your insurrection. it lasted two or three days. the violent part of it and then after that i was appointed to be the security
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
would have retarded what later became the arc of u.s./british reconciliation. that is not the purpose of your book but has that occurred to you? it has occurred to me for some time. >> they will indeed have enjoyed defiling the image of the father of our country. >> maybe but mostly because it becomes a grievance. individual grievances interfering with reconciliation with between countries. >> despite the fact that it was really jennings and some of his co-workers who followed through on the actual rescue that is why i would never say is fair to give dolley madison the credit because her patriotic impulse to make sure that didn't happen that led to the rescue of the portrait. if you go to see one of these portraits of george washington painted by gilbert stuart there is the one in the east room that is there today because of the action of jennings and others but also another one that is in the national portrait gallery. it is 95 inches high. you don't know until you look at it was an effort of work had to be to remove it from the wall. .. >> this event was part of the 2012 nat
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
, i was the commander of u.s. naval forces in vietnam who decided in 1968 to use agent orange to defoliate vegetation of the vietnam delta. at the time it seemed to be an intelligent decision. the u.s. army had been using agent orange for three years. they believed their experiences had confirmed what the military had been assured by the chemical companies, that the only known human ill effects was the development of -- [inaudible] on the skin of some exposed individuals. as is well known, 20 years later in august 1988, my wife and i lost our first-born son, elmo iii, from both hodgkins disease and nonhodge consistent lymphoma. i have been deeply saddened by the additional insights i have gained. chemical companies have known for many years that these substances were harmful. they had exchanged data amongst themselves about such harmful effects and have delayed in some cases many years in making reports to government concerning these harmful effects. bud zumwalt -- close the quote. bud zumwalt had asked all the right questions, but he received dishonest answers. and he was intent
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:00pm EST
registered democrat. it is actually kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approach me and asked me if i was interested in the job, i was going to different excuses as to why didn't want to go to washington. i was very happy being with a prosecutor. i was getting married. finally, when all those arguments had failed, i said in a very dramatic way, by the way, you know that i am, in fact, a registered democrat. and he kind of winced. and i thought i came back and said i contributed to barack obama two weeks ago to his campaign. [laughter] but it was not a political point, it was a narrative that appointment. they thought i had the right experience to protect us giant bailout from criminal fraud. >> neil barofsky, when you look back at the administration itself, not how it was administered, but the legislation, what were some of the flaws come interview? >> i think what often happens, it is understandable given the sense of emergency this was a hastily crafted bill. one of the things as it had a lot of policy goals in the bill. but it didn't have the mechanisms -- he didn't mandate certain
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
been just about everything is in their better or worse. >> do you have any insight with u.s. providence -- president has of preference for a dog as a family pet? [laughter] maybe they never met a cat that they like. [applause] more questions? >> as a little christmas gift could you give us the recitation of the todd akin poem? >> with murdoch. let me see if i haven't. if you think about what would happen if you would call in a political consultant who specializes with women's issues to say have your candidates bring up the subject of rape. not as the unmitigated evil. [inaudible] >> great. [laughter] he travels with me. he tells me what page. that is a different one. that is three republican candidates discourse on the subject of rape. we can do that one. i will never find the other one. he will be fired. we will get another one. [laughter] this is called a female of reproduction system election by representative todd akin from the house committee on space and science and technology. legitimate rate will shut the thing down. so if she gets pregnant it shows that her gown was
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 4:15am EST
democratic forces. what is your basic take and how the u.s. handled itself and how the rebellions have been going on? >> that's an enormous question. there's ways in which we have -- i think i would be among those who would say we relate to be supportive of change in egypt. i think we should have been there quicker, supporting change. but that said, that might be unrealistic. but we did in iran was actually very well calibrated. but we have to understand is that from from the point of the view, for there to be will change it has to be indigenous. as american people, we have a role in everything and we want to fix it. sometimes the help is not wanted. in the case of serbia, the students in serbia and is a of madeleine albright was supported because word got to vent because one of their stickers was on her desk in the state state department while they were active in their fight. they send back a message saying thank you, that's wonderful. we let you are supporting us. nothing would undermine us quicker than for everyone to believe we are some madeleine albright in a ditch, cemex tension
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
for general audience in the united states but globally. i start in the u.s., i and in the u.s.. i feel as though the story is particularly needed in the united states. i don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
, one of the largest libertarian conferences in the u.s. talked to book tv about the fast and his book "the making of modern economics." this is about 20 minutes. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. we are on location in las vegas. in annual event organized by this author, mark stousen. tell us to a first of all, what is free of dust and how did talk about? >> a little bit about everything. our renaissance gathering. we have a little bit of everything for everybody. we did a very wide group. we even have an investment conference. wealthy investors, concerned citizens. the focus on political and economic and financial freedom and a strong. we're beer every year with over 2,000 people at this event. ruling. next year will be moving to caesars palace. ethier next year will be, are we round? unthinkable be a good controversial topic. >> sponsored by the libertarian party? >> i hate labels. and i give up and give my talk and tell them, st everyone is an individual. everyone is different points of view. with a white political levels. i guess libertarian would be the closest thing if you w
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:25pm EST
as assistant attorney general, managing the antitrust division of the u.s. department of justice. mr. president, i happen to have come to know bill baer personally, because practices flaw a firm with a very good friend and neighbor of mine here in washington. and in that remarks i can certainly testify to the -- and in that regard, i can certainly testify to the fact that he's an honorable, interesting, enjoyable person, but that alone doesn't qualify him to hold this high office. he has extraordinary experience. i would say that he is very, very widely acknowledged as one of the best antitrust lawyers in our country, and i would say that this nomination is really a merit-selection nomination. and i'll get to that. he graduated from lawrence university and the school of law at stanford university. he has served with distinction throughout his career, earning accolades such as recognition as the washington, d.c., antitrust lawyer of the year by "best lawyers" and as well as one of the decade's most influential shall lawyers by the "national law journal." he's currently head of the ant
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:00pm EST
remember saying to my husband my goodness, what's going to happen? there won't be any more u.s. government bonds because we're going to be out of the debt situation. we saw -- we saw it on the horizon when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back, backwards on rates across the board from the wealthiest to the middle to the poor, and he put two wars on a credit card and we are where we are where we are. and to add to this history, we all know that we're coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult, led by, unfortunately, some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulsen can you explain the rule of derivatives here and what happened and how we got into this crisis? and he put his head in his hands, mr. president, and he said not now. i'll talk to you later. now, that's not a very encouraging thing when the secretary of the treasury puts his head in his hands and says i can't explain it now. so we're coming out of this difficult time, and guess
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime ever tried to assassinate a u.s
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 6:30am EST
became an investment banker and then he became u.s. budget director under president clinton. people were talking about him as a possible treasury secretary. at fannie mae, raines carried on with the fast growth policies of jim johnson. the clinton administration aide him on. in july 1999, hud secretary announced an effort he would increase the percentage of their mortgage financing that went to low or moderate income families, to 50% in 2001, from 42% that was set back in 1995. cuomo said these new rules would provide affordable housing for 28.1 million families over the next decade. think about it. cuomo could promise to create 28.1 million homeowners without asking congress to spend a single penny. he simply told fannie and freddie to go out and do it, and they said we would be delighted. you remember how jesus spent the 5000. well, cuomo housed the 28.1 million. rains also have ambitious goals for-profits. he set a goal of doubling earnings to $6.46 per share in five years. is $6.46 was taken very strictly by his team. this is a peptalk from a senior vice president at fannie mae.
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00pm EST
these stylist, you are also getting the u.s. the collector to plug into your computer and of course you have your ear buds, thises and the reader, it will read the books to you for kids. even non amazon, there is a free application you can download for you can text for free. it is amazing but it is more than a books, music internet, and it will work and play functionality out of it is all but also, can you believe, it is candle, lowest price in history, this will also be lowest price tablet that we have for the rest of the year, and we have free shipping. thus and $40 guesses at home in new shoppers, remember that you do qualify, if you have a debit card, a major credit you are in, you have it. the only thing i do want to ask you about, we will show you what you get is well but i do think these are the nicest cases we have ever made it available. rugged, after all, it keeps it out together, we have in various colors we have the royal blue brown white, black, red , pink and i love to welcome your testimonials but everything from the stylists, at u.s. be connector, had set , all of yo
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 8:00am EST
. strong u.s. dollar, monetary policy. that's the intersection. if i can jump ahead, the intersection when it comes to democrats is civil liberties. look, let's repeal to the patriot act. i never would have signed the act allowing for you and i to be arrested and detained without being charged by the u.s. government. let's bring about marriage equality. let's get out of afghanistan tomorrow, bring the troops home. let's end the drug wars. look, these are democrat issues, historically democrat issues that they aren't going anywhere on today just like republicans historically their issues have been about dollars and cents, and neither, neither one of the parties do well in the areas that they're supposed to do well. they're horrible in the areas that they don't do well, meaning romney is horrible on civil liberties, and obama is horrible when it comes to dollars and cents. >> host: as a libertarian now, is it a little tougher to get media attention away from the two-party system, and especially as the campaign goes on this fall? >> guest: well, speaking for myself personally, actually,
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
because no one could ask for it better company than the u.s. armed forces and finally, i do this for myself so that i might know the measure of myself and in and not be found wanting. i believe that it is my duty to fight and having done all that i can to simply stand against this and all the evil work that is upon this earth. he called me on the fifth and said, the people are so nice and the kids are so cute, mom. they would rather have pens and paper than food or water. can you get a fund-raiser started when school starts? two days later i was talking to my students on the first day of school about starting that fund when the marines walked down the hall to tell me that matthew had been killed. in a sniper attack while saving others. from the book, so blind written as if matthew were telling the story it reads, we went out at base camp toward an area where we knew there would be danger. recent intel had reported that some 80 taliban would be in the vicinity. not more than 10 minutes into our patrol shots rang out. my team dismounted and cleared an enemy position in a mud house. i c
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
lye coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy e sveltes and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> an update from capitol hill now where lawmakers just ended meetings here on the fiscal cliff. and "the washington post" blog, a quote from senator joe lieberman when asked as he exited the senate democratic caucus about a deal, he said he'd be with shocked if a deal was struck today, that the parties are much farther apart than he hoped they'd be by now. and a tweet from one of the reporters here says senator reid makes an offer to gop, doesn't say what it is, and says e republicans' offer of calculating inflation with the chain cpi was an act of desperation. we'll bring you back to this if the senate comes back into session. in the meantime, we return to our regular booktv programming. >> and now joining us again on booktv is senator rand paul. his second book, "government bullies," senator, who are the bull
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00pm EST
one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to completely rearrange that, and he came up with you do, one of his generals, to thin
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 10:15am EST
pretty clear cut. it's kind of liked it is analogous to the u.s. government responsibility and there is a beautiful book talks about 1837 when a mob kills the reverend who is an abolitionist. they killed him because they destroyed his press because they didn't love what he had to say and he pointed out in a moment in history when they realize not only the free speech. the main concern is to make sure the investor issue prevents them from happening and they condemn it and do the best to prevent it from happening. first the campuses have to not senator you and would be happy if they stopped doing that but they can't let the mob. a perfect example of when these two forces came together to work as one and it's in the book washington state university, the student wrote a play called the passion of offending of a buddy. he put it on the ticket. he put it everywhere. it isn't easily defended and this african-american student had the absolute goal of defending everybody and he made a point of it defending it all throughout. the university worked with students angry about the content of the p
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 9:15am EST
historian patrick o' donnell recounts the u.s. army's second ranger battalion company, also known as "dog company". the group was composed of 68 men in a military campaign during world war ii including landing on the beaches of normandy and the ascent of point do hawk. it starts right now on booktv. [applause] >> thank you for having me here today. it is great to see so many of my friends here. this is a situation where things of come full circle in many ways. is a trite saying that today is the bat -- anniversary of the battle of volusia where i got started as a combat historian. on that day i will never forget we went through an aid station in -- and al qaeda aid station. there was blood on the floor and cots, a situation that was interesting. i will never forget looks on the side of the wall, the light had changed. there was obviously a person that was running next to me on the other side of the wall. i had this sense of foreboding. seconds later, a marine was killed along with a member of the iraqi forces that were accompanying us. it was a very poignant moment, shot in the head, the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30pm EST
constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution the made a number of crucial changes and one of them was that they had it won german executives and i believe was up a five-year executive term. >> professor, was there a lot of political insight during the war in the south? >> there were no political parties. none of the things that interest in the party is it quickly was on the ropes and never really materialized. there was political opposition but it was in a quick kind of format. theoretically, everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican ticket you couldn't vote for a lincoln and certainly in the deep south, but they were all aligned with the southern wing of the democratic party and aprendo war the opposition rose and some of the more profoundly opposed to the davis administration on very good grounds it was a federally concentrated power regime of the entirety of american history. one looked at the union government, the structure of the states and the federal government in the union in the state's and the federal the limit in the confederacy and says the con
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:15pm EST
. and i called my publisher up and said, can i get 10,000 books donated to the u.s. so? and they said, sure, that was so easy. and i called another publisher and i said, can i get ten thousand books, they said sure. so we had 40,000 books donated to the uso, and i tell you, i never -- whether it was because of that or other ropes, the troops love thrillers, and they said we don't want to send literary fiction, they want thrillers. and so when i got there it was amazing how many readers we had there who just really like that fast-paced action adventure, so we have been blessessed having the military read our books. >> host: when you write the thrillers, you keep the language issue odd out there. >>> i do. i had a woman who wrote to me and said, i love your books, and i read one of the books and the language was -- i wanted to give it to my younger son to read and i couldn't do it. i said, i can do it without the language. so now i get all these letters, authors, people are saying to us, you choo write like brad meltzer, and he doesn't curse, and then i tell them to skew themselves and
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
foreign regulation, a law in india, accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water a
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:15am EST
, editorial director of the vice president of "u.s. news and world report" for the daily news, "atlantic monthly". currently he is editor-at-large for writers and you may know him as i do, as the author of the book, the american century. sir harold is one one of the wos most distinguished journalist and has received the highest awards for his lifetime achievement. please welcome sir harold evans. [applause] >> my contribution is that my grandfather was illiterate and all never forget the time my father was reading the daily times which i was then editing and if other was a steam train driver who left school at 11. but loved reading. he flung the paper to one side and he said, is that amazing that you are reading the newspaper in your grandfather could not have read a word of it? that was the influence really of reading, first marmite father and then my mother who left school at 11 and went to work in the cotton field. we are going to have a discussion and a wonderful start with walter dean and how we can actually get people to read. there is no question. this is carla hayden. you can fin
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00am EST
congress. do not ask what do we do inside the u.s. house of representatives. do either of you look for these books to make him out by members of congress are politicians? >> guest: i certainly note them, but a few at least from a standpoint that these books are a way to entrench these of congress not only in positions, but potentially to position them for future runs within their current offices are maybe something different. it seems as if it's more of a calling card and furthering careerist authors. the authors of books is yet another feather in the cap of politicians. deshaies a way of announcing to the public that they are part of the larger conversation. >> host: it's going to sound a little cynical or skeptical. i also wonder how much the book is written by a member of congress given their schedules and the need to raise money. i always remember that they had no horicon wrote the campaign biography for a patronage job. the whole tradition of campaign books. the beauty of obama's memoir was he wrote it before he was a publication with a little less open anything. as long as he was
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
money in front of him? the money was in the u.s. treasury in washington, and he never had access to it. and after that date it was tied up in the courts. so how could he have used this money to free slaves? and how did he have that option of no, i'm going to back off of this, i don't want to free my slaves. i'm really confused as to how he ever had access to those funds. >> the will end up in litigation because jefferson didn't act on it quickly enough. he had in his hand a letter from kosciuszko saying that whatever you may for here from europe, might intention for my american funds remains fixed, meaning that kosciuszko, that his intentions to have that money used by mr. jefferson to free mr. jefferson slaves remains fixed. now, if mr. thomas jefferson walked into the county courthouse carrying kosciuszko's will, caring and letter from kosciuszko business i want is acted upon, do you think the court is going to delay? well, only because jefferson didn't press it. he didn't want to press it. anything else? billy speakers access to money -- [inaudible] income were going to john barnes
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